history

USU History Department

An eminent professor of History and Religious Studies at Utah State University, Dr. Norman Jones has spent a career learning what makes an "educated person."

In forty years at USU, Jones headed the History Department, founded Religious Studies and Classics, and taught thousands of students, who honored him as Teacher of the Year in 1982 and 2018. 

Amazon

Historian and Harvard professor Laurel Thatcher Ulrich was recently on the USU campus to give a talk presented by the USU History Department and sponsored by the Tanner Talks Series in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Twitter: @usubrazil

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Dr. Jason Gilmore, assistant professor of Communication Studies at Utah State Unviersity. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite episodes of the program.

NearSt

Witty, inspiring, and charismatic, Oscar Wilde is one of the Greats of English literature. Today, his plays and stories are beloved around the world. But it was not always so. His afterlife has given him the legitimacy that life denied him. Making Oscar Wilde reveals the untold story of young Oscar's career in Victorian England and post-Civil War America. Set on two continents, it tracks a larger-than-life hero on an unforgettable adventure to make his name and gain international acclaim. 'Success is a science,' Wilde believed, 'if you have the conditions, you get the result.'

Amazon

Utah State University’s Mountain West Center for Regional Studies has announced the 2018 winners of the Evans Biography Awards for books published in 2017. Author and ethnographer Rodney Frey won the Evans Handcart Award for his book Carry Forth the Stories: An Ethnographer’s Journey into Native Oral Tradition (Washington State University Press, 2017).  

Daniel James Brown’s bestseller “The Boys in the Boat” is a story about beating the odds and finding hope in the most desperate of times—the improbable, intimate account of how nine working-class boys from the American West showed the world at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin what true grit really meant.

NPR

The Curies' newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.

CNN

The editors of The Atlantic write: “The election of Donald Trump … [has] driven many Americans to rummage through history in search of context and understanding. Trump himself has been compared to historical figures ranging from Ronald Reagan to Henry Ford, and from Andrew Jackson to Benito Mussolini.

True West Magazine

After oil was discovered beneath their land in the 1920's, the richest people per capita were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. They rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions and sent their children to study in Europe. 

 

philly.com

Both George Orwell and Winston Churchill came close to death in the mid-1930's—Orwell shot in the neck in a trench line in the Spanish Civil War, and Churchill struck by a car in New York City. If they'd died then, history would scarcely remember them. At the time, Churchill was a politician on the outs, his loyalty to his class and party suspect. Orwell was a mildly successful novelist, to put it generously.

The Mountain West Center For Regional Studies

The Bennion Teachers' Workshop for the Perpetuation of Democratic Principles is a program made possible by an endowment to Utah State University's Mountain West Center for Regional Studies.

Harper Collins Publishers

  On Tuesday’s Access Utah, Jim DeFelice joins us to talk about his new book “

Hobby Lobby, an arts and crafts store, bought more than 5,000 ancient artifacts for $1.6 million. The artifacts were imported against federal law. Hobby Lobby has returned the artifacts to Iraq and paid a fine of $3 million. One expert has advice for collectors on how to stay inside the law.

Utah State University

  

"Remember that you will die..." 

On today's spooky edition of Access Utah, we talked with some of Utah State University's foremost experts on the history, art and tradition of death. 

A new online exhibit sponsored by the USU's University Libraries "traces the thematic iconographies of death, dying and mourning."

Titled "Memento Mori," Latin for "Remember that you will die," the exhibit shows how symbols of death and the afterlife became dominant in art with the dawn of western Christianity. 

cachecounty.org

In the middle of the Cache County Fair Grounds, four iconic buildings stand for their last county fair. Shortly after the fair finishes this year the Home Arts building, the 4-H building, the Community building and the Art building will be torn down. Community leaders are organizing a celebration for the 100-year life of these buildings.

Steam Engine Pulls Into Cache Valley Station

May 10, 2017

On May 10 1869, Union and Central Pacific Railroads joined their rails at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory and forged the destiny of a nation.  At that time, two steam engines marked the monument with a loud thrust of steam and blowing of engine whistles.  

Historic Train Visits Cache Valley

Apr 25, 2017
Evan Hall

The train pulled into Cache Junction Tuesday morning and was greeted by a crowd of adoring schoolchildren, retired railroad workers, and locomotive history enthusiasts. This marked the first time the No. 844 steam engine, the last one purchased for Union Pacific, has stopped in Cache Valley in 20 years.

Park City Group Aims to Restore Historic Mines

Apr 15, 2016
HISTORYTOGO.UTAH.GOV

A group of community leaders, avid skiers and history buffs is dedicated to preserving historical mining sites throughout Park City Mountain Resort.