DEBUNKED

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DEBUNKED is the only Utah podcast combining evidence-based health practices with storytelling to dispel harmful myths and stereotypes about people who use drugs, persons in recovery, and evidenced-based harm reduction efforts. Our mission is to foster understanding and reduce stigma. Every episode features the voices of people directly affected, researchers and medical professionals, and community partners. Our aim is to nurture an open dialogue around what has been a taboo topic in Utah for far too long.

DEBUNKED is a project of the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative, housed in the Office of Health Equity and Community Engagement of the Utah State University College of Education and Human Services, Department of Kinesiology and Health Science, in partnership with USU Extension. The Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative (TROI), promotes evidence-based best practices across the state of Utah in an attempt to reduce the burden of the opioid crisis in our home state, particularly in our tribal and rural communities. Our 12-person editorial board is made up of local individuals from tribal communities, harm reduction organizations, substance use treatment programs, Extension professionals, and public health experts.  Utah Public Radio produces the podcast, with support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rural Opioid Technical Assistance program.

 

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The season one finale of Debunked features highlights from four of our most acclaimed episodes. These clips illustrate the negative impact that stereotypical beliefs can spread through communities and the heartfelt narratives of those who work every day to heal those wounds. Debunked season one focused on providing education about reducing harm and stigma of substance use disorder, and evidence proving that harm reduction builds healthier communities, is more effective in reducing overdose deaths and infectious disease, and promotes a better understanding of opioid use disorder.

Todd Trapani

This month we are debunking the myth "once a junkie, always a junkie." This episode is a discussion between our host, Tim Light, and featured guests Maia Szalavitz, journalist and best-selling author of "Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction," and Savannah Eley, Opioid Prevention Specialist for Southeastern Utah Health Department. 

raisingchildren.net.au

This episode is hosted by Tim Light, and our featured guests include Carlos Riveria, Co-Founder & CEO of Generation Red Road; Dr. Lisa Schainker, USU Extension Assistant Profession, Home and Community; Dr. Amy Khan, Executive Medical Director for Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah; and Julie Flood, Smart Recovery Group Facilitator. Join us for a discussion that affects households everywhere, and hear experts explain the negative impacts of adding stereotyping to an already unfortunate and stressful situation.In this episode, we debunk the myth and correct the damaging stereotype that "kids who use drugs have bad parents."

https://www.nursetogether.com.

“Essential services” is one of the 2020 buzzwords that it is very unlikely any of us were thinking about before the global pandemic. But in March, as COVID cases began to spread throughout the U.S. and as business and organizations began to shut down, defining what had to stay open became crucial. 


Mauricio Mascaro, Pexels

Episode 12 of DEBUNKED raises awareness of other substances that can cause use disorder and overdose, and Debunks the myth that “only people who use opioids are at risk of overdose."

A white church building in front of a blue sky.
Daderot

There’s no doubt faiths, and the communities surrounding them, can be profound and powerful. Faith affects our value systems and our culture. Our faith may also influence how we see ourselves and someone else. 

The top of a white police car with lights flashing blue.
Pixabay

Episode 11 of DEBUNKED defines harm reduction efforts surrounding substance use disorder and debunks the myth that “harm reduction practices increase crime and drug use in my community." This episode is hosted by Tim Light, who is joined by Heather Bush, Utah Department of Health Syringe Exchange Program Coordinator and Michelle Chapoose, Tribal Liaison and Coordinator of the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah. Our guests discuss science-based harm reduction statistics, common fears about harm reduction, and how understanding the variety of substance use disorder treatment options can help reduce the stigma that plagues substance users and interferes with public safety.

If you would like information about Naloxone training or are in need of Narcan, please contact Debunked through Facebook at facebook.com/debunkedpod.

Courtesy of Ashanti Moritz

J. Carlos Rivera is a tribal member of the Sherwood Band of Pomo Indians and also of Mexican descent. When it comes to healing, he follows the guidance of Wallace Black Elk, of the Lakota tribe.

Pixabay

In episode ten, we discuss another culturally-sensitive myth by debunking the idea that “all Native Americans do is drink, gamble, and take money from the government.” This episode is hosted by Tim Light and co-hosted by Michelle Chapoose, Tribal Liaison and Coordinator of the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative's Tribal Opioid Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah. 

fourthstreetclinic.org

Wash your hands with soap and water frequently throughout the day, keep a six-foot distance between yourself and others, use hand sanitizer when you’re on the go, mask-up when you’re outside your own house and, most importantly, stay home if you feel sick. 

Five smiling teenagers sitting on a bench.
Naassom Azevedo, Unsplash

In episode nine, we are Debunking the myth “Not my kids.” Our host, Tim Light, welcomes co-host Dr. Stacey MacArthur, Utah State University Extension 4-H and Youth Programs; Tim Keady, USU Extension Assistant Professor of Health & Wellness and HEART Initiative team member; Charla Bocchicchio, author of My New Normal: A Mother's Story of the Opioid Epidemic; and Gabriel Glissmeyer, USU Masters degree student who has experienced life as the sibling of a substance user. 

People with substance use disorders face enormous internal and external challenges on the journey to recovery. Harm reductions services aim to keep people safe while using drugs as well as helping them eventually reach recovery. Cultural and community background plays an important, but often overlooked, role in these services. 

Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

 

In episode eight, we are debunking the myth “Methadone or suboxone are no different than heroin.” Our host, Tim Light, welcomes co-host Savannah Eley, Opioid Prevention Specialist with Southeastern Utah Health Department; Dr. Lauren Prest of Moab Regional Hospital; Garth Mullins from the Crackdown podcast; and Dr. Erin Madden, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences at Wayne State University. The group discusses the science of and the stigma associated with MAT options used to treat opioid use disorder.

 

 

Mindy Vincent started Utah’s first syringe exchange program in 2016. 

That was right after the state legalized it. 

 

“People were appalled,” said Vincent, founder of the non-profit Utah Harm Reduction Coalition. “People were like, ‘oh my gosh, you’re gonna do what? You’re gonna enable drug use. What kind of craziness is this?’” 

Donald Tong, Pexels

In episode seven, we are debunking the myth "The only legitimate treatment for addiction is abstinence."

In episode six, we are debunking the myth “Native Americans have a predisposition to addiction.”

In episode five, we are debunking the myth “Addiction can be cured if you have enough willpower.”

Our host, Tim Light, welcomes guests Michelle Chapoose, the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative Tribal Liaison Coordinator from the Tribal Opioid Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah, Dr. Patrick Green, from Bonneville Family Practice in Tooele, Utah, and Adam Baxter from the Tooele County Chapter of Young People in Recovery, to discuss the science of addiction, barriers and opportunities along the journey of recovery.

 

Gustavo Fring, Pexels

This episode is a special follow-up to the March 19, coronavirus special. In this episode we focus on debunking the myth, "Only elderly and immunocompromised individuals are at risk of adverse outcomes from COVID-19." 

It features guests Michelle Chapoose, TRIO Tribal Liasion Coordinator from the Tribal Opioid Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah; Dr. Nathan Allen, ER Physician in Montana; and Paul Harkin, Director of Harm Reduction at Health Right 360 in San Francisco.

 

On this special coronavirus-themed episode of 'Debunked' our hosts will be looking at myths related to COVID-19.

Anemone123, pixabay.com

Our second episode focuses on debunking the myth that "good people like me don't become addicted to drugs." It features guest Michelle Chapoose who is a member of the Tribal and Rural Opoid Innative and the tribal liaison coordinator from the Tribal Opioid Resource Center in Roosevelt, Utah; Dr. Christina A. Porucznik, an associate professor and associate division chief for education in the division of public health; and Jay Hymas of Clear Recovery Cache Valley.   

This first episode introduces the Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative, and the state of the opioid crisis in Utah. It features guest Heather Bush from Utah Department of Health, a Syringe Exchange Program Coordinator and Dr. Erin Fanning Madden, assistant professor in the Division of Epidemiology and biostatistics at University of New Mexico Health Science Center.   We review information about how the crisis began, and set the stage for debunking a myth in each of our episodes moving forward.

 

 

The Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative, housed in the Office of Health Equity and Community Engagement, is launching a new podcast. The 12 episode “Debunked” podcast premiers February 12, 2020 and will address opioid use myths.