UnDisciplined

Fridays at 2:00 p.m.

Each week, UnDisciplined introduces its audience to two scientists, working in different fields – and then introduces them to each other. The result is a lively, informative and accessible discussion about the ways in which scientific research impacts all of our lives. 

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Do you know what kills more women during and after pregnancy than anything else? The answer is probably going to surprise you. And do you have a pretty good understanding of how evolution works? If so, we might have another surpirse for you. 

Earth.com

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the way dolphins survive in captivity, and the way humans make decisions based on the chemicals in their bodies. 

Phys.Org

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about how things start. 

First, we'll be joined by a physical scientist who's uncovered a secret about how water begins to freeze.

Then, we'll chat with a health scientist who will tell us about how to start a revolution in healthy behaviors.

Joining us in studio is Valeria Molinero, a professor of theoretical chemistry at the University of Utah. Her team's recent study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society explains how tiny proteins control the initial formation of ice at various temperatures that are almost never exactly 32 degrees. 

Also joining us, from Calgary, Alberta, where she is an epidemiologist whose work focuses on the role of energy balance in cancer prevention, is Lin Yang. Her team's recent work shows that despite health warnings, Americans still spend way too much time sitting.  

PetMD

This week on UnDisciplined, we've gathered two of our favorite fellow science geeks to talk about the headlines that caught our eyes in June — and a few we wish would have gotten more attention. 

Cleveland Clinic

This week on UnDisciplined, we're going to talk about the factors that influence our moods. How do the institutions around us inspire us to take action? And how do the things we put into our bodies impact the way we see the world?

Pharmaceutical Journal

This week on UnDisciplined, we're going to chat with a scientist who is trying to solve a big challenge: engineering blood vessels for transplantation into human bodies. After that, we'll talk to a researcher who is trying to solve a challenge that might be even bigger: reducing gender pay disparities in corporate America. 

WebMD

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking to researchers on two sides of a huge scientific challenge. Our first guest researches climate — that means she only has one test subject to work with: the Earth. Our second guest studies cancer, which presents differently in humans and other organisms. That means she has endless test subjects. 

Robert Snow / Ocearch

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about artificial intelligence, great white sharks, illegal pollution, snail genes, and new rules for leaders at the National Institutes of Health. That's right, it's the May Science News Roundup. 

University of Utah

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about scientific puzzles. For instance, why is it that hundreds of tree species can exist within a single acre of rainforest, but the same species is almost never found next to itself?

Or, here's another one: Why is it that individual animals from the same species — dogs, for instance — can exhibit such tremendously different traits when it comes to aggressiveness?

Bob Hubner / WSU

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about biofuels ... and tattoos. 

We're introducing an archaeologist and a chemical engineer, and if that doesn't already sound like a strange pairing, just consider what these guys study. 

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about math education and ... zombies? 

If those two things seem like they don't have anything to do with each other, well, that's the idea. On our show, we bring together researchers from vastly different areas of study, and we ask them to build connections. And that takes ... brains. Get it?

University of Oxford

Our world often seems to be really divided, particularly across cultures in which everyone seems to play by different rules. But today we're going to hear from a researcher who believes there are actually seven universal moral rules that have been embraced by pretty much every society.

Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about black holes, pig brains, and water on the moon as we round up the most intersting, important, and awe-inspiring science stories from the past month with an amateur astronomer, an environmental epigeneticist, and a podcasting paleontologist. 

UnDisciplined: Superlatives And Survival

Apr 19, 2019
Animal Ark

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about big things and small things, loud things and fast things, things that kill and things that survive being killed — but we're doing it a little differently than normal. 

University of Utah Health

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about life hacks, including some that work — like do-it-yourself glucose balancing devices used by increasing numbers of individuals with diabetes — and some that don't, like the common practice of using weekends for recovery sleep. 

Emanuele Biggi via Amphibian and Reptile Conservation

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about some pretty scary things. 

Foundation for Economic Education

This week on UnDisciplined, we're gathering the gang for another science news round-up. 

As we talk about some of the biggest stories in science over the past few weeks, we'll be joined by a biomedical researcher, a wildland ecologist and an experimental psychologist. 

Baldomero Olivera

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about pain, but — as usual — we're approaching it from two very different points of view. One of our guests is a researcher whose discoveries about toxic snails could help lead to painkillers. The other is a health communications expert who studies the way people communicate about pain on social media. 

via Thrillist

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about big animals like wolves, bears and lions — and really tiny life forms, like yeast. 

By happenstance, we're joined by two researchers whose recent work comes out of the same university, but who are meeting for the first time on a public radio program recorded hundreds of miles from either one of them. 

UnDisciplined: Making A Scientific Match

Mar 10, 2019
Getty

Every week on UnDisciplined, we put to researchers from completely different fields together and see what connections they can make. 

The Indian Express

This week on UnDisciplined, we're gathering up a motley gang of science geeks to talk about some of the biggest stories in science over the past few weeks. 

Gizmodo

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the ways computers help people do things better. 

One of our guests studies the way video games can be used to build better workplaces. Our other guest researches how artificial intelligence can help us tell better jokes — that's right, better jokes. 

Gail McCormick / Penn State

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about stress, but from two very different scientific points of view. 

Patrick Alexander / Flickr

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the intersection of science and personal decision-making — and, of course, we're looking at it from two very different perspectives. 

Daphne Zaras / NSSL

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about climate, but at two very different scales. 

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