How Hospitals Have Adapted Communications To COVID-19

Apr 13, 2020

With the coronavirus pandemic, we are constantly being told new information. Hospitals have been constantly evolving as new information on the virus. 

Megan Raschke is an imaging tech assistant at Logan Regional Hospital. She works first hand with patients that could be exposed to the virus.

“So right now what we have to do is when we go into any patient's room, we must sign their door, with our name, and what personal protective equipment we are, along with what department we're from," said Raschke. This is to guarantee that if someone comes back with COVID, that we may not have been originally testing, they're able to trace back what we wore and if they need to monitor us further.”

If a patient ends up testing positive for COVID-19, the employee health nurse will contact everyone who has been exposed or worked with that patient.

“She'll contact you and if there is concern for exposure, she will put you on a two week temperature monitor so you'll have to monitor your temper,  take it twice a day and record it into their online survey. Which she will send through your employee email. And if it gets above 38.5 Celsius, 100.5 Fahrenheit, you are not allowed to come to work you have to go home or stay home and possibly be checked out or be tested for COVID-19,”said Raschke.

Before coronavirus, Raschke said the hospital would send employees updates weekly for big events.

“We are now receiving daily updates from our are like the administrator and different people throughout the hospital we get a daily update for  our caregivers along with like our physicians or non-clinical caregivers just kind of give an update on what should be properly done if policies or procedures changes," said Raschke. "So there's a lot of change coming and going things are constantly being changed different interpretations different, new knowledge been brought aboard”

Hospital leads also check in on their employees to ensure they are healthy and keeping track of their health.

Editor's note: The temprature in the on-air version and the original version of this story was incorrect. This has been corrected.