UnDisciplined

Fridays at 2:00 p.m.

Each week, UnDisciplined takes a fun, fascinating and accessible dive into the lives of researchers and explorers working across a wide variety of scientific fields.

University of Utah Health

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about life hacks, including some that work — like do-it-yourself glucose balancing devices used by increasing numbers of individuals with diabetes — and some that don't, like the common practice of using weekends for recovery sleep. 

Emanuele Biggi via Amphibian and Reptile Conservation

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about some pretty scary things. 

Foundation for Economic Education

This week on UnDisciplined, we're gathering the gang for another science news round-up. 

As we talk about some of the biggest stories in science over the past few weeks, we'll be joined by a biomedical researcher, a wildland ecologist and an experimental psychologist. 

Baldomero Olivera

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about pain, but — as usual — we're approaching it from two very different points of view. One of our guests is a researcher whose discoveries about toxic snails could help lead to painkillers. The other is a health communications expert who studies the way people communicate about pain on social media. 

via Thrillist

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about big animals like wolves, bears and lions — and really tiny life forms, like yeast. 

By happenstance, we're joined by two researchers whose recent work comes out of the same university, but who are meeting for the first time on a public radio program recorded hundreds of miles from either one of them. 

UnDisciplined: Making A Scientific Match

Mar 10, 2019
Getty

Every week on UnDisciplined, we put to researchers from completely different fields together and see what connections they can make. 

The Indian Express

This week on UnDisciplined, we're gathering up a motley gang of science geeks to talk about some of the biggest stories in science over the past few weeks. 

Gizmodo

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the ways computers help people do things better. 

One of our guests studies the way video games can be used to build better workplaces. Our other guest researches how artificial intelligence can help us tell better jokes — that's right, better jokes. 

Gail McCormick / Penn State

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about stress, but from two very different scientific points of view. 

Patrick Alexander / Flickr

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about the intersection of science and personal decision-making — and, of course, we're looking at it from two very different perspectives. 

Daphne Zaras / NSSL

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about climate, but at two very different scales. 

Getty Images

In UnDisciplined's first ever monthly science news roundup, we're joined by three researchers, plus a fellow science enthusiast, to take a look at recent science news through a bunch of different perspectives. 

National Institutes of Health

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about why we don't do the things we know we should do. Why, for instance, don't we get as much sleep as we're supposed to? And why do we often withhold information from our doctors? 

Catarata Films

We're talking about the ways warfare can build bonds in tribal societies, and how air pollution can have devastating effects in our modern world. 

Utah Pulbic Radio

2018 is going to be remembered as a huge year in science. 

It was the year we took tremendous leaps forward in aritificial intelligence. It was when we faced the contorversial case of the world's first gene-edited babies. And,  it was the year we shot a billionaire's car into space. 

But here at Utah Public Radio, we're hoping 2018 is remembered for another reason: as they year we first started broadcasting UnDisciplined. 

Genetic Literacy Project

This week on UnDisciplined, we're joined by a scientist who helped create a transgenic mouse that can help us understand the human relationship with a vital molecule. We'll also chat with a researcher who just announced the discovery of nearly 50 new species right here in Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. 

NASA

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking to a researcher whose work is going to change the way you think about the red planet. Then, we're going to talk to a scientist who is changing the way we think about how to diagnose and treat neurodegenerative diseases. 

Shannon Tushingham / Washington State University

This week on UnDisciplined, we talked to a researcher whose discoveries have changed the way we understand the history of tobacco in North America. Then we chatted with a scientist who is trying to change the way we think about cryptocurrencies. 

Utah Wildfires
upr.org

This week on UnDisciplined, we unpack two studies that are changing conventional wisdom. 

Our first guest is Ella Bean, who is changing the way people think about neanderthals.

Our second guest, Brendan Murphy, wants to reconsider the way we think about wildfires. 

Chris Bunker / The Daily Universe

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about really small things, like cell cultures and their effect on research, and really big things, like our planet's climate and its effect on human movement. 

Laurie Sparham/Miramax Films/Reuters

What do Judi Dench and Samuel L. Jackson have to do with ending crime waves and curing blindness? We'll find out this week when we're joined by guests Elizabeth Vargis and Sherry Towers. 

Alan Levine / Flickr

Each week on UnDisciplined, we bring two researchers together to talk about their recent work. 

This week, we're joined first by Karen Lloyd, whose research suggests microbial dark matter may be all around us. Then, we talked to Jacob Freeman, who uses trash to study the synchronous rise and fall of societies. 

Utah State University

Paul Rogers is racing to save a one-tree forest. Lisa Berreau is trying to prove that carbon monoxide can be good for us. Like we do every week, we'll try to draw connections between these two very different areas of work. 

Peter Forest / Getty Images (via NPR)

This week on UnDisciplined, we're talking about how evolving research impacts health recommendations. 

First, we're joined by Sarah Hartz, who believes that what you've been told about alcohol consumption is probably wrong. 

Then, we'll talk to Theo Ross, whose work shows that the health advice that comes from personal genetic testing often turns out to be wrong, too. 

Institute of Zoology

This week on UnDiscipined, we're talking about extending life — how nature does it and how humans might do it. Grace DiRenzo investigates the way animals evolve to beat deadly natural chemicals. Laura Niedernhofer studies natural chemicals that might help us prevent aging and put off death. Together, we'll talk about Fisetin, frogs, fungus, zombies and immortality. 

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