Access Utah

Weekdays 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Access Utah is UPR's original program focusing on the things that matter to Utah. The hour-long show airs daily at 9:00 a.m. and covers everything from pets to politics in a range of formats from in-depth interviews to call-in shows. Email us at upraccess@gmail.com or call at 1-800-826-1495.

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newpages.com

Growing up in a gang in the city can be dark. Growing up Native American in a gang in Chicago is a whole different story. This book takes a trip through that unexplored part of Indian Country, an intense journey that is full of surprises, shining a light on the interior lives of people whose intellectual and emotional concerns are often overlooked. This dark, compelling, occasionally inappropriate, and often hilarious linked story collection introduces a character who defies all stereotypes about urban life and Indians.

KSL TV

The midterm elections are (mostly) in the books. The Democrats took control of the U.S. House of Representatives and made some inroads in governorships and state legislatures. The Republicans expanded their majority in the U.S. Senate. In Utah, Mitt Romney became Senator-elect, the race for the 4th Congressional District is too close to call. Several of the Propositions on the ballot appear headed for passage. And turnout was extremely high. We recap the elections and look ahead with Damon Cann, USU Professor of Political Science.

Amazon

The King’s English Bookshop (TKE) has published a collection of Ann Cannon’s Salt Lake Tribune columns. It’s titled “I’ll Tell You What.” Ann Cannon joins us for the hour on Monday’s Access Utah.

qconline.com

“I’m a person who listens for a living. I listen for wisdom, and beauty, and for voices not shouting to be heard. This book chronicles some of what I’ve learned in what has become a conversation across time and generations, across disciplines and denominations.” That’s Krista Tippett, host of “On Being” (heard on UPR Sunday evenings at 5:00) talking about her new book “Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living” Tippett has interviewed many of the most profound voices examining the great questions of meaning for our time.

frenchculture.org

Today we're previewing an upcoming concert, War and the Human Heart: Songs of Battle, Loss, and Love commemorating the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day and honoring veterans. We'll speak with Jeffrey Gettleman, an attorney in the Chicago area, who is the artistic director and producer of the concert. Our other guest is Craig Jessop, Music Director of the American Festival Chorus & Orchestra. 

wkyt.com

Record numbers of women are running for office and engaged in the political process this year. We’ll ask why? And is this temporary or a lasting trend? What will all this mean this year and going forward? As a part of the UPR Original Series, Utah Women 20/20, we’ll discuss these issues on Wednesday’s Access Utah.

Basic Books

"What a novel my life has been!" Napoleon once said of himself. Born into a poor family, the callow young man was, by twenty-six, an army general. Seduced by an older woman, his marriage transformed him into a galvanizing military commander. The Pope crowned him as Emperor of the French when he was only thirty-five. Within a few years, he became the effective master of Europe, his power unparalleled in modern history. His downfall was no less dramatic.

Twitter: @jmgossard

Julia Gossard, assistant professor of history at Utah State University, says that since thousands of witch trials took place across Europe and North America, one stereotypical image of an early modern woman is that of a witch. Gossard teaches a class called “Witches, Workers, & Wives,” which examines attitudes, ideas, and stereotypes about gender, sexuality, and power - including how the witch became a quintessential early modern trope. Julia Gossard is giving a presentation on Halloween for the USU Center for Women and Gender.

Salt Lake County Center for the Arts

War is not an abstraction. And the wounds of war don’t stop at the warrior. They reverberate through families and communities. The salient question remains “When does war end?” For veterans and their families and loved ones the answer is complex. “Between War & Here” is a new collaboration between journalists and musicians, exploring honor, courage, loss, and hope, with music, poetry, and memoir.

U of U Press

In his new book “Back Cast: Fly Fishing and Other Such Matters” Jeff Metcalf writes: “These waters have been my home, and I fish them more than most. In truth, they have saved my life on more than a few occasions. I seek refuge in the quiet solitude of rivers, and in dark hours of my life—including this particular year—I need desperately to be fly-fishing." Metcalf’s play “A Slight Discomfort,” is a humorous take on his battle with prostate cancer.

Publishers Weekly

From Anne Lamott, the New York Times-bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow, comes the book we need from her now: How to bring hope back into our lives.

Washington Post

James A. McLaughlin grew up in rural Virginia and lives in the Wasatch Range east of Salt Lake City. His debut novel “Bearskin” is getting rave reviews. He joins us for the hour next time on Access Utah.

KUER

Rep. Mia Love says the Federal Election Commission has cleared her of illegal fundraising and that her challenger, Ben McAdams, is unethical and should withdraw from the race. Also, four women ask the Utah Supreme Court to assign a special prosecutor to sexual assault cases that the Salt Lake County District Attorney's office declined to pursue. And the story of an unsolved murder from 1978 shows how evidence is maintained--and how cold cases are investigated today.  At 9 a.m.

Penguin Random House

Today on Access Utah, as a part of “Our Favorite Books” series, we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the publication of Willa Cather’s “My Antonia.” Tom Williams’ guests include Cather scholars and USU professors Evelyn Funda and Steve Shively. Funda says that “My Antonia” is fresh and contemporary and raises issues about immigration, assimilation, class and female power that resonate today. We also talk about Funda’s mother, also named Antonia, who escaped her native Czechoslovakia in 1955 as the Communist Iron Curtain closed in.

Fox 13

Scott Howell and Thomas Wright, co-chairs of the Utah Debate Commission will join me to talk about the debates, which are airing on Utah Public Radio, and the political climate in Utah and the nation as we head into the midterm elections, now less than three weeks away. Scott Howell is a former state senator and senate minority leader, and candidate for the U.S. Senate. Howell is CEO Howell Consulting Group and a retired IBM Executive. Thomas Wright is former chairman of the Utah Republican Party and current President & Principal Broker, Summit Sotheby’s International Realty.

thejudgefilm.com

Religious courts in the Middle East had historically banned women from adjudicating domestic and family matters - in both the Shari'a courts of Islam and the Rabbinic courts of Judaism -until Kholoud Al-Faqih, dares to challenge that history. With the support of a progressive Sheik, Kholoud becomes the first woman judge with her appointment to a Palestinian Shari'a court in the West Bank, bringing a subtle new perspective garnered from her early professional life working with battered women as an attorney in both the criminal and Shari'a  courts.  

 

 

WBUR

On Monday's Access Utah, Jim DeFelice joins us to talk about his new book “

Book Depository

For generations, the Wrights of southern Utah have raised cattle and world-champion saddle-bronc riders ― some call them the most successful rodeo family in history. 

Now, Bill and Evelyn Wright, parents to 13 children and grandparents to many more, find themselves struggling to hang on to the majestic landscape where they’ve been running cattle for 150 years as the West is transformed by urbanization, battered by drought and rearranged by public-land disputes.

religiousstudies.usu.edu

Today we're speaking with Margaret Barker, Dr. David Haberman, and Anuttama Dasa, panelists at the conference God & Smog:  The Challenge of Preserving Our Planet. The conference is taking place today in the USU John M. Huntsman School of Business Perry Pavilion until 5 p.m.  The one-day symposium will consider the environment in relation to the perspectives and actions of five religious traditions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Mormonism, and Native American traditions.

PLoS Blogs

  A coalition of faculty and students at USU have come together to organize a day-long discussion of sexual violence, in order to understand the issues that informed the Kavanaugh hearings and investigation. This teach-in will happen on Tuesday, October 9 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the USU Anthropology Museum (Old Main 252) on the USU campus.

Mashable

“Bridge of Clay” is the new sweeping family saga from Markus Zusak, author of the international bestseller “The Book Thief,” which swept the world and was made into a movie.

 

“Bridge of Clay” is the story of five brothers who bring each other up in a world run by their own rules. As the Dunbar boys love and fight and learn to reckon with the adult world, they discover the moving secret behind their father’s disappearance.

 

NPR

In a remote corner of Oregon, James Pogue found himself at the heart of a rebellion. Granted unmatched access by Ammon Bundy to the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Pogue met ranchers and militiamen ready to die fighting the federal government.

American Folklore Society

In the age of the Nano-second, folklore studies claim a perspective on the critical importance of the short-lived, as observed in numerous traditional forms such as memorial altars, henna-painted Yemen brides, and evaporative moments, such as the traces left by marginalized queer encounters or the reformulation in art of Mormon legend by local Provo artist Bryan Hutchison.

USU History Department

An eminent professor of History and Religious Studies at Utah State University, Dr. Norman Jones has spent a career learning what makes an "educated person."

In forty years at USU, Jones headed the History Department, founded Religious Studies and Classics, and taught thousands of students, who honored him as Teacher of the Year in 1982 and 2018. 

glencanyonexhibit.com

Iconic Utah outfitter Ken Sleight began his river-guiding career in Glen Canyon during the mid-1950s, just as the Glen Canyon Dam blueprints jumped from the drawing board to remote desert terrain. The pulse of the Colorado River through the canyon would soon be halted by a cement wall and Glen Canyon backfilled with water. Sleight knew the condition of the canyon was terminal.

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