Access Utah

Weekdays 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Access Utah is UPR's original program focusing on the things that matter to Utah. The hour-long show airs daily at 9:00 a.m. and covers everything from pets to politics in a range of formats from in-depth interviews to call-in shows. Email us at upraccess@gmail.com or call at 1-800-826-1495.

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usu.edu

Photographer, marriage and family therapist and Utah State University alum Kimberly Anderson was on the USU campus in early March to give a presentation on her work. Her presentation, “Transitioning Within Landscapes: The Photography of Kimberly Anderson,” touched on her work as a photographer interwoven with her identity as a transgender woman.

eastbayexpress.com

Thi Bui was born in Vietnam three months before the end of the Vietnam War, and came to the United States in 1978. In November, she presented a lecture "Finding Home," based on her debut graphic memoir, “The Best We Could Do,” a beautifully illustrated and emotional story about the search for a better future and a longing for the past.

Thrive Global

Utah’s K-12 public schools are closed and teachers are teaching their students online because of precautions to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

allevents.in

Linda Hirshman, acclaimed historian of social movements, delivers the sweeping story of the struggle leading up to #MeToo and beyond: from the first tales of workplace harassment percolating to the surface in the 1970s, to the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal—when liberal women largely forgave Clinton, giving men a free pass for two decades. Many liberals even resisted the movement to end rape on campus.

Flickr: @ginnerobot

We’re compiling another UPR Community Booklist and we want to know what you’re reading. 

elevatecorperatetraining.com.au

On Tuesday’s Access Utah, as a part of UPR’s Project Resilience, we’re going to talk about how to be resilient with all that’s happening with the coronavirus pandemic, including social distancing. We’ll also talk about how all of this is impacting children and individuals with disabilities.

Debunking COVID-19 Myths On Monday's Access Utah

Mar 23, 2020
coronavirus.utah.gov

DEBUNKED is a new podcast produced by the USU Tribal and Rural Opioid Initiative and USU Extension in conjunction with Utah Public Radio, which focuses on harm reduction and debunking myths around the opioid crisis. Their newest episode focuses on COVID-19.

Lotus Themes

As we all deal the best we can with Coronavirus and COVID-19, we want to hear examples that you have heard or experienced of people, businesses or organizations doing good.

Harvard Health

The Utah Legislature concluded its 2020 session on Thursday. We’ll recap the session on Monday, with a special focus on issues important to people in rural Utah. We’ll also talk about COVID-19 and Coronavirus.

current.org

On Tuesday’s Access Utah, Tom Williams will talk with UNLADYLIKE2020 Executive Producer Sandra Rattley and series creator Charlotte Mangin.

sltrib.com

The tax reform bill that was passed in December by a special session of the Utah Legislature was soundly repudiated by a referendum drive that collected the required number of signatures before the regular session of the legislature began in January. Lawmakers subsequently repealed the tax reform bill. We wondered: what about now? Is there still a need for reform? What should happen next? What is likely to happen next? We’ll talk with the organizer of the referendum drive, Fred Cox. Our guests will also include Rep.

webmd.com

The Coronavirus epidemic has affected lives around the world and in Utah. We’re going to talk about it Monday on Access Utah. More than 2,500 deaths have been reported in China. Iran is second in numbers of deaths. Two people have died so far in Washington state.

stonybrook.edu

Crystal Marie Fleming, Ph.D. is an author, public intellectual and expert on white supremacy and global racism. She is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Stony Brook University with affiliations in the Department of Africana Studies and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Dr.

tooelecity.org

For the first time Utah voters are participating in the Super Tuesday presidential primaries this year, and ballots are already arriving. In the days leading up to the primary we’re interested in hearing what you’re thinking and the factors you’re considering in making your decision on how to vote. Continue the conversation by emailing us at upraccess@gmail.com. 

Americans Who Tell The Truth

Robin Wall Kimmerer is a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She is the author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and Teaching of Plants, and Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses. She lives in Syracuse, New York, where she is a SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor of Environmental Biology, and the founder and director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment.

utah.com

Various Moab government and business leaders have come out in opposition to the Trump administration’s plans to allow an oil and gas lease on the nearby Slickrock Trail. The group is decrying what they say is an opportunity currently mis-understood by the Department of the Interior to support the power of world famous recreation assets like the Slickrock Trail. They say that these types of outdoor treasures bring revenue flows and tax receipts to public land communities and create real long term jobs and that oil and gas development does not deliver the same economic benefits.

news.mit.edu

  "Eight years ago, Bob Inglis ran for a seventh term in the U.S. House of Representatives and didn’t even make it out of the Republican primary. He lost by nearly 3 to 1. His estrangement from South Carolina voters ran deep, friends-gone-missing and allies-turned-enemies deep.

Salt Lake Tribune

Utah State University has signed an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) concluding its Title IX compliance review of USU’s policies and procedures for responding to reports of sexual misconduct involving students between 2013 and early 2017.

The review found university-wide failures in USU’s processes to prevent and respond to incidents of sexual misconduct. It also echoed the findings of USU’s own internal inquiry, conducted in fall 2016.

blogs.marriot.com

We’re heartened by all the good being done in our communities by dedicated individuals and nonprofits. They sometimes don’t get the recognition they deserve, and you may want to help but don’t know where and how. Today we’re opening the phone lines, email and Twitter to give you the opportunity to spotlight a nonprofit or individual doing good in your community.

wqow.com

The U.S. Senate has acquitted President Trump of both impeachment charges brought against him by the U.S. House of Representatives. Sen. Mitt Romney was the lone senator to break party ranks when he voted to convict the president on the first impeachment charge. today we’re going to look back on this historic impeachment and look forward to the presidential election.

The Seattle Public Library

An alternative prison ranch in New Mexico conducts a daring experiment: setting the troubled residents out to retrain an aggressive herd of horses. The horses and prisoners both arrive at the ranch broken in one way or many— the horses often abandoned and suspicious, the residents, some battling drug and alcohol addiction, emotionally, physically, and financially shattered. Ginger Gaffney’s job is to retrain the untrainable. With time, the horses and residents form a profound bond, and teach each other patience, control, and trust.

ABC News

Co-directors of the USU Digital Folklore Project Jeannie Thomas and Lynne McNeill (USU English Department Head and USU Assistant Professor of English, respectively) will join Tom Williams to talk about the 2019 Digital Trends of the Year.

Hasty Book List

Sadie Hoagland’s new book “American Grief in Four Stages,” a collection of short fiction, asks the question: why does our country do so little for the bereaved? Why do we have only empty cliché to address the grief of others? Why do we expect people to just "get over" insurmountable tragedy?          

wisegeek.com

Retired USU professor Richard Ratliff has developed what he calls the theory of Relationism, which he hopes will help us bridge the many divides we’re experiencing in our increasingly polarized society. He’ll join Tom Williams to explain.

Amazon

Over the span of fifty years, Charles M. Schulz created a comic strip that is one of the indisputable glories of American popular culture—hilarious, poignant, inimitable. Some twenty years after the last strip appeared, the characters Schulz brought to life in Peanuts continue to resonate with millions of fans, their four-panel adventures and television escapades offering lessons about happiness, friendship, disappointment, childhood, and life itself. 

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