Access Utah

Weekdays 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Access Utah is UPR's original program focusing on the things that matter to Utah. The hour-long show airs daily at 9:00 a.m. and covers everything from pets to politics in a range of formats from in-depth interviews to call-in shows. Email us at upraccess@gmail.com or call at 1-800-826-1495.

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Wikipedia

A coalition of organizations is hosting a national virtual event today, August 6, and Sunday, August 9, on the 75th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, to commemorate the survivors of nuclear weapons and production. Still Here: 75 Years of Shared Nuclear Legacy will include highlights from local events, stories from survivors, and a look toward a future free from nuclear threats.

capsa.org

Today on Access Utah we’re going to check in with CAPSA, a domestic violence, sexual abuse, and rape recovery center serving Cache County and the Bear Lake area. CAPSA’s Misty Hewitt says that rates of domestic violence are up during the pandemic. We’ll talk about services, reporting abuse, and healing from trauma, among other topics. We’ll also check in with Hilary Renshaw from USU’s Office of Equity, addresses cases of sexual misconduct and discrimination at USU

Utah State University


  

Poet Ben Gunsberg will join us for Access Utah on Monday. He’s been writing poems for the pandemic. We’ll hear some of those poems today. His latest collection is “Welcome, Dangerous Life.” He writes about the vulnerability of being a parent. He says (in an article in Utah State University Today) “The stakes are raised once you’ve got children. The title [of the collection] sort of hints at the way life seems more dangerous once you have children, once you have this vulnerable being you’re responsible for, and the way the world has colored and changed.” Ben Gunsberg will read some of these poems as well. 

 

 

Wildwords.net

“I began my writing career by exploring the tracks humans have left in nature. Now I’m mostly interested in the tracks nature leaves in us.” That’s author Gary Ferguson. He says that nature provides beauty, mystery and community, traits that each of us very much needs. He is the author of 25 books.

 

edicsonruiz.com

Venezuelan double bassist Edicson Ruiz is one of the premier double bass soloists in the world. He is a previous winner of the International Society of Bassists solo competition and in 2003 became one of the youngest members of the Berlin Philharmonic at the age of 18. He’s described as a shining example of the ground-breaking El Sistema.

Penguin Random House

In a world where rational, scientific explanations are more available than ever, belief in the unprovable and irrational–in the fringe–is on the rise. There’s a new book out called “The Unidentified: Mythical Monsters, Alien Encounters, and Our Obsession with the Unexplained.” The author, Colin Dickey, will join me for the hour on Monday’s Access Utah. We’ll talk about everything from the great Kentucky Meat Shower of 1876 to UFOs to QAnon and Pizzagate.

CNN

Following the death of George Floyd in May, protests across the nation have demanded police reform and an end to systemic racism in policing. Today we’ll talk about how we’re doing with this in Utah. We'll speak with Rep. Sandra Hollins, D-Salt Lake City; and Darlene McDonald, Chairwoman of the Utah Black Roundtable and a member of the newly-created Salt Lake City Commission for Racial Equity in Policing. We'll discuss systemic racism and police reform on the city and state level.

Salt Lake Tribune

Today we’ll take a look at the Coronavirus pandemic’s effects in Utah jails and prisons. Our guests will include Salt Lake Tribune reporter Jessica Miller; Mayra Cristobal, whose husband has contracted COVID-19 and is incarcerated at the Weber County Jail; and Angie Millgate, whose former husband is incarcerated in the Washington County Jail.

NEHMA artmuseum.usu.edu

The work of photographer Craig Law is included in an exhibition at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art at Utah State University. The exhibit is called Sky Above, Earth Below: A History of Western Landscape Photography.  You can view the exhibit at artmuseum.usu.edu.

pattypetpsychic.com

Patty Rayman was born with the ability to communicate with animals and has helped thousands of people resolve many types of behavior, health, attitude and relationship issues with their animal companions. In working with all types of animals, she has developed techniques to help people move from conflict to cooperation in their relationships. 

Flickr

Every year for Earth Day, we check in with writer and photographer Stephen Trimble, author of “Bargaining for Eden: The Fight for the Last Open Spaces in America,” and many other books. This time, Stephen Trimble suggested we also reach out to his friend, ecologist, ethnobotanist and writer, Gary Paul Nabhan.

Utah State University

While artist Chris Terry is known for his contemplative interior landscapes, an exhibition at the USU Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art (NEHMA) featured the experimental work he was able to create during four sabbaticals throughout his tenure at USU.

wallpaperflare.com

We’re compiling another UPR Community Booklist and we want to know what you’re reading. What’s on your nightstand or device right now?  What is the best book you’ve read so far this year? Which books are you suggesting to friends and family? We’d love to hear about any book you’re reading, including in the young adult & children’s categories. One suggestion or many are welcome. 

Amazon

Today we talk with Heather Lende about her new book Of Bears and Ballots: An Alaskan Adventure in Small-Town Politics.

bringingnaturehome.net

Douglas Tallamy’s first book, “Bringing Nature Home,” awakened thousands of readers to an urgent situation: wildlife populations are in decline because the native plants they depend on are fast disappearing. His solution? Plant more natives.

twitter

 

Several years ago, writer Paisley Rekdal created a digital community project that mapped the people, places, buildings and events that defined Salt Lake City. When she became Utah’s poet laureate, she decided to build on this idea and create a literary map for the entire state.

On Tuesday's Access Utah, we revisit our conversation on Betsy Gaines Quammen’s new book, “American Zion: Cliven Bundy, God & Public Lands in the West,” and David Quammen’s book “Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Pandemic,” and how current social issues intersect with the two. 

USU

Photographer, marriage and family therapist and Utah State University alum Kimberly Anderson was on the USU campus in early March to give a presentation on her work. Her presentation, “Transitioning Within Landscapes: The Photography of Kimberly Anderson,” touched on her work as a photographer interwoven with her identity as a transgender woman.

USU Statesman

On Thurday's Access Utah, we looked back on our

 preview an Ethics Slam: an event modeled around a Poetry Slam in the sense that it occurs in a community space and it is open mic. Members of the community are asked to share their thoughts in a civil, respectful manner about a pressing social issue. This slam focused on responding to climate change. 

Jodi Byrd joined Tom Williams to discuss the next lecture in the USU College of Humanities’ Tanner Talks series: “Digital Animus in the Age of Liberation.”

From Utah State Magazine, "In the parched black desert of northeast Jordan, archaeologists recently unearthed a stone hearth containing loaves of flatbread more than 14,000 years old.

"The samples contained wild einkorn -- an ancestor of modern wheat. The bread-like discs were likely not an everyday foodstuff for the hunter-gatherers. But in the centuries since, wheat has become the most widely grown cereal crop in the world. That's why researchers at Utah State University are working to protect the global wheat supply."

Jeff Meldrum is Professor of Anatomy and Anthropology at Idaho State University. He is author of “Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science.” He is a leading expert on Bigfoot or Sasquatch, or the term he prefers: “Relict Hominoid.” He says “...[I]t is one matter to address the theoretical possibility of a relict species of hominoid in North America, and the obligate shift in paradigm to accommodate it, but there must also be something substantial to place within that revised framework.

ABC4 Utah


Meatpacking plants in Cache Valley have been hit hard with COVID-19 with several hundred workers diagnosed with the disease in the past several weeks. Community organizations and individuals are trying to provide needed help to the affected families. Some of the workers at the JBS plant in Hyrum staged a walk-out to protest the company’s handling of the coronavirus outbreak.

thisherplace.org

This Is Her Place is a new podcast that tells the remarkable stories of Utah women, past and present, in all their diversity. Businesswomen and religious leaders, poets and politicians, healers and homemakers, artists and activists, women in the Beehive state have never fit into easy stereotypes.

Flickr: Adam Annfield

Barbara Farris is a retired health education teacher who lives in Cache Valley. Until March of this year she was in Zambia with the Peace Corps DREAMS program.

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