Lynne McNeill

Utah State University Office of Research

Quoting Kristen Munson in Utah State Magazine: “In mid-January, the internet was awash in sea shanty videos on TikTok. A week later, memes of Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, bundled in a Burton coat and sweater mittens, made the rounds on Twitter. Within minutes, Sanders, originally photographed at the January 20 inauguration ceremony, was Photoshopped sitting on a subway, perched on the iconic Friends couch, and on the White House lawn near a boy pushing a lawnmower. Where do memes come from and why do we love them so?”

University of Utah Press


It’s UPR’s Spring Member Drive. On Access Utah that means some very special programming, including some Best Of segments from favorite episodes and some great new conversations. Today we’re talking about food and food culture and folklore with Lael Gilbert, one of the hosts of UPR’s Bread & Butter feature; and Lynne McNeill, folklorist and Associate Professor in the USU English Department. We’ll hear some Bread & Butter segments and a portion of our Access Utah conversation from October with the editors of the book This is the Plate: Utah Food Traditions. 

 

Twitter: @kathryniveyy

Today we look at the top Digital Trends of 2020, from the fun to the profound. Each year folklore students at Utah State University track digital trends. They then meet at the end of the year to prepare a ballot that goes out to a national panel of experts in digital folklore, which selects the winning trend. Top results for 2020 include #BreonnaTaylor and #GeorgeFloyd, as well as the meme: “How It Started/How It’s Going/How It Ended,” and gender-reveal, presidential election, and Zoom meetings memes.


Amazon

The first book-length treatment of Utah’s distinctive food heritage, “This is the Plate” traces Utah’s food history from pre-contact Native American times through the arrival of multinational Mormon pioneers, miners, farmers, and other immigrants to today’s moment of “foodie” creativity, craft beers, and “fast-casual” restaurant-chain development.

Utah State University Office of Research


It’s UPR’s Fall Member Drive and Tom Williams will be joined for the hour by Lynne McNeill, Co-Director of the Digital Folklore Project at USU and Associate Professor of English.

 

ABC News

Co-directors of the USU Digital Folklore Project Jeannie Thomas and Lynne McNeill (USU English Department Head and USU Assistant Professor of English, respectively) will join Tom Williams to talk about the 2019 Digital Trends of the Year.

ABC News

Co-directors of the USU Digital Folklore Project Jeannie Thomas and Lynne McNeill (USU English Department Head and USU Assistant Professor of English, respectively) will join Tom Williams to talk about the 2019 Digital Trends of the Year.

Amazon

Legend Tripping: A Contemporary Legend Casebook explores the practice of legend tripping, wherein individuals or groups travel to a site where a legend is thought to have taken place. Legend tripping is a common informal practice depicted in epics, stories, novels, and film throughout both contemporary and historical vernacular culture. In this collection, contributors show how legend trips can express humanity’s interest in the frontier between life and death and the fascination with the possibility of personal contact with the supernatural or spiritual.
 

Utah State University

Today on Access Utah, we remember acclaimed folklorist Barre Toelken. Our guests include Randy Williams, folklore curator and oral history specialist with the Special Collections and Archives at the Merrill-Cazier Library, USU Assistant Professor of English Lynne McNeill, and Barre's daughter Kazuko Toelken.

Amazon

Legend Tripping: A Contemporary Legend Casebook explores the practice of legend tripping, wherein individuals or groups travel to a site where a legend is thought to have taken place. Legend tripping is a common informal practice depicted in epics, stories, novels, and film throughout both contemporary and historical vernacular culture. In this collection, contributors show how legend trips can express humanity’s interest in the frontier between life and death and the fascination with the possibility of personal contact with the supernatural or spiritual.
 

USU Office of Research and Graduate Studies

Folklorist and USU Assistant Professor of English Lynne McNeill joins me for this special pledge drive edition of the program. We’ll hear a segment from a recent episode featuring Chef Nephi Craig, founder of the Native American Culinary Association. We’ll also feature a portion of one of our most memorable episodes, an interview (from 2011) with Utah author Lee Cantwell. His novel “Mother George” tries to flesh out an incredible true story for which there is little information: Mother George was a black midwife who practiced her art in a small southeastern Idaho town for 40 years.

USU Digital Folklore Project

It’s the top Digital Trends of 2018, from the fun to the profound, on the next Access Utah. We’ll talk about the “Me Voting in 2016 vs. Me Voting in 2018” and “My Culture is Not Your Prom Dress” memes along with explorations in the digital world of #MeToo and toxic masculinity and, yes, we’ll probably end up talking about cats as well.

TEDX USU

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is folklorist and USU Assistant Professor of English Lynne McNeill. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some great episodes of the program.

Utah State Today

There was a tie atop the 2017 Digital Trend of the Year survey conducted by the USU Digital Folklore Project. The top trends were: #MeToo and the phenomenon of fake government
social media accounts like @AltUSNatParkService.

Alyssa Roberts

We are continuing our pledge drive this week with more of the best of Access Utah. Today's program has excerpts from our lighter and fun programs. USU assistant professor of English Lynne McNeill, and our own development officer Ted Twinting join us for the hour to encourage your pledges and talk about what makes Access Utah so great. We appreciate your support and hope you have as much fun listening to our show as we have making it. 

 

A new study by Joseph Grenny and David Maxfield, co-authors of four New York Times bestsellers on interpersonal communication and influencing human behavior, reveals that more and more of us are losing connection with our lives in order to earn “likes” and social media praise. We have, in a sense, turned into social media “trophy hunters.”